Toolbar



For many users a tool bar is indispensable, and Cherrytree comes with the most commonly used functions and options on it's tool bar. There are more in the menus, but the most used are easily accessible in the tool bar. Also note that many of the functions of the tool bar buttons and menu items can be reached via keyboard shortcuts and the right-click menu. You can customize what tools are visible and available in the toolbar via the Toolbar Preferences.
NOTE: Many of the icons pictured here will look different from what you may see. This is due to Cherrytree using many of the operating system / desktop default icons for common functions that it shares with other programs.


images/23-1.png Add New Node. When clicked this button will add a new node at the same tree level as the current node.

images/23-2.png Add New Sub-node. When clicked this button will add a new sub-node to the current node.

images/23-3.png images/23-4.png Forward / Backward. When clicked these buttons will take you to back and forth through the nodes you have viewed or worked in, much the same as the buttons in a web browser.

images/23-5.png Save File. When clicked this button will save the current document to the current folder. If you wish to change the name of the document and/or it's location, you will have to do that through the "File>Save As..." menu item. If you haven't named the document yet, it will ask you for a name first.

images/23-6.png Create PDF. When clicked this button will open a dialog where you can choose whether to make a pdf file from the current node, a node and it's children, or the whole document.

images/23-7.png Open Document. When clicked this button will open the default file system window where you can browse for an existing Cherrytree document to open.

images/23-8.png Open Recent Document. This button will most likely appear differently, depending on your operating system / desktop, and will be the same as various other drop-down menu arrows. When clicked it shows a list of your most recently used documents, allowing you to quickly change to another document without having to go through the "open file" dialog or menu.

images/23-9.png Undo. When clicked this button will undo the last edit or action. Repeated clicking will continue to undo actions until it reaches the limit specified in the Miscellaneous section of the Preferences dialog.

images/23-10.png Redo. When clicked this button will redo a previously undo. Repeated clicking will redo all undoes until it reaches the first one.

images/23-11.png Search in All Nodes. When clicked this button will open the Find dialog for searching in all nodes. This is the most powerful and often used searching tool in Cherrytree, and why it has it's own tool bar button.

images/23-12.png Set / Unset Bulleted List. When clicked this button will set / unset a paragraph or group of selected paragraphs as a bulleted list. Often used when you want to emphasize a list of points or explanations. NOTE: When toggled on, bullets become "sticky", meaning if you're at the end of the line of text in a paragraph and hit <ENTER> the new paragraph will inherit a bullet. To end a bulleted list (start a new "normal" paragraph) press <ENTER> twice. If you don't want and extra carriage return after the last bulleted paragraph, simply toggle the bulleted list button off after pressing <ENTER> once.
Tip: If after creating your bulleted list you decide you want to change the order of the paragraphs in it, place the cursor in the paragraph you want to move. Press and hold <ALT> and then press the up or down arrows on the keyboard, this will move the paragraph up or down one paragraph at a time.

images/23-13.png Set / Unset Numbered List. When clicked this button does the same as the bulleted list above, only using sequential numbers instead of bullets. Each new paragraph will get the next number in ascending order. Often used to list points or explanations in order of priority or importance.
Tip: If you have several paragraphs in a numbered list, and decide you want to re-order them, it's easy to do. Place the cursor in the paragraph you want to change the order of, press and hold <ALT>, then press the up or down arrow keys on the keyboard. The paragraph will move up or down one paragraph at a time. Once you have it where you'd like it, select all the numbered paragraphs, toggle the Numbered List button off, then on again. All your paragraphs will be re-numbered in order.

images/23-14.png Set / Unset To-do List. Need a to-do list? This button when clicked on will add a check box at the beginning of each new paragraph. This check box is interactive, and has three states. The default is of course, an unchecked box, showing the item has had no action taken. Click on it once, and it produces a checkmark, showing that item is completed. Click on it again, and it shows an "X", which can be used to indicate that the item has failed to be done, or whatever the user decides to interpret the mark to mean. You can clear the marks by clicking again, which will return the box to it's default state.
While in itself this seems a simple to-do list function, it can become much more powerful and flexible when combined with Cherrytree's ability to link and use anchors. See those sections for an explanation of how.
Tip: As you think of and add tasks in your to-do list, you may want to prioritize them, putting important or urgent ones nearer the top of the list. This is easy in Cherrytree. Simply place the cursor anywhere in the task's paragraph and press and hold the <ALT> key, then press either the up or down arrow keys on the keyboard. This will move the paragraph up or down in the list. If your to-do item contains more than one line, just highlight all the lines it contains to move them.

images/23-15.png Insert Picture. This button inserts an image at the current cursor position. When clicked it opens a desktop file dialog (meaning it will be the same file dialog your desktop system uses), allowing you to choose a graphic file to place at the cursor position. When you select the file, it will open another dialog where you can size the graphic. This sizing dialog is proportional, meaning if you're not sure how to resize a 1024x768 pixel graphic to something that will be only 100 pixels wide, don't worry. Just type "100" in the dialog's "Width" option and press <ENTER>. Cherrytree will automatically calculate the "Height" to keep the graphic's proportions. From this dialog you can also rotate the graphic in 90 degree increments. If once you have inserted the graphic you decide you're not happy with the size and want to make it bigger or smaller, just right-click on it and choose "Edit Image" from the pop-up menu. It will re-open the dialog where you can assign another size.
If you select an existing graphic in a Cherrytree node and click this button, it will open the file dialog and allow you to choose another graphic file to replace the existing one.
NOTE: Cherrytree currently does not support text wrapping around graphics. Graphics currently are treated the same as any text object, meaning you can move them horizontally with characters, spaces and tabs on the left of the graphic. You can center and right align them, but you currently can't wrap text around them like in many word processors and DTP software. This may become an option in future versions if there's enough demand for it.

images/23-16.png Insert Table. This button will insert a table at the current cursor position. When clicked it opens a dialog where you can set some basic things like number of columns and rows, minimum and maximum cell sizes, and whether to import it from a CVS file. See "Tables" under "Inserting Objects" in this manual for more on these options.
If you select and existing table in a Cherrytree node and click this button, it will open the table settings dialog and allow to you change the tables properties.
NOTE: Tables in Cherrytree are just for organizing text and numbers, they don not do any calculations like a spreadsheet. You can copy and paste tables out of many programs and web pages into Cherrytree, but it will only show the results of any formulas (the normally visible text or number in the cells), all formatting and formulas will be lost. Making Cherrytree tables more powerful and flexible is another feature that may be implemented if user demand for it is high enough.

images/23-17.png Insert Codebox. This button will insert a codebox at the current cursor location. A codebox it a self-contained text wrapper of a user-definable size. What this means is while - as it's name implies - these text boxes are normally used to hold lines of programming code, they can also be used to hold any kind of text.
The main function and use for codeboxes though is as containers for multiple lines of programming code. The advantage to using a codebox as opposed to just writing or copy and pasting code into a node is the ability to assign one of the programming languages syntax highlighting to the contents. If you were to set a Cherrytree document's Automatic Syntax Highlighting to HTML for instance, all the text in that document would inherit the HTML highlighting style, regardless of whether it was HTML, C++, Python or just plain text. You could assign a node's properties to another style, but then anything you type into that node would also inherit that syntax style, whether it was part of the code or not. By leaving the document and node's properties to the default (no syntax highlighting) and using a codebox, you can set the programming language option for the codebox and leave the rest of the node for typing in other information, like what the code does, or what it's used for. For more on the codebox settings options, see "Code Box".
If you select and existing codebox in a Cherrytree document and click this button, it will allow you to change that codebox's properties.

images/23-18.pngInsert File. This button will open a file dialog where you can choose a file to insert. Any type of file can be inserted, and will be represented as an icon. The file itself is embedded into the Cherrytree document. This is useful for people who share their Cherrytree documents with others, it allows them to include a file without having to remember to send it along with the Cherrytree document. Once the file is inserted, and icon will appear where it was placed in the node, and the recipient only has to right-click on it to extract the file to their computer.
NOTE: Currently it is not possible to click on the file icon and have it open in the native application. That will come in a future version of Cherrytree.

images/23-19.png Insert Link. This is one of the most powerful and often used buttons in Cherrytree after it's search functions. For a deeper explanation of what kinds of links you can have and how they're used, see "Links".
To choose what text you use for a link, you can either place the cursor in a word and Cherrytree will use that single word, or highlight a word, words or entire sentence in a node to be used. If the cursor is not on a word, or no text is selected, Cherrytree will open a dialog box asking you for a name for the link, a word or string of text you want to use, to be more descriptive than just having the link text itself.
When you click this button, you will open a dialog which allows you to use that text as a link to something else, whether a web page, a file, a folder, another node or an anchor. If you haven't selected any text before clicking the button, Cherrytree will tell you there's no text selected.
NOTE: If you don't want to use some text for your link and are satisfied with the web address itself as the link, just copy the link from the browser's address bar and paste it directly into the Cherrytree node, Cherrytree will automatically create the link.
Often it's desirable to have something more descriptive of the link than a web address, file or folder name, even node and anchor names. Let's say you found a great website for Italian recipes. Having "www.http://ramon.cook.net/en/co_345-00_th$vr#.html" on the node page may not mean a whole lot when you search for it or see it later. By typing "Really great original Italian recipes for pasta dishes" and selecting that for your link text, it will be easier to find and make more sense to you later.

images/23-20.png Insert Anchor. This button creates an anchor at the current cursor location. When clicked, it opens a dialog where you can assign the anchor a name. Anchors are useful when you have a particular place in a node that you want to be able to link to, instead of the entire node itself. You create an anchor and give it a meaningful name. Then when you create a link back to it from another node, you select "To Node" in the link dialog, select the node that contains the anchor, press the anchor button on the right to see a list of the anchors in that node, and select your anchor. When you click that link in the future it will not only take you to that node, but right to the paragraph containing the anchor. See "Anchors" for more on this.

images/23-21.png Remove Formatting: This button removes the last format style used to the currently selected text. It removes both forground and background colors, as well as any of the character styles such as bold, h1, monospace, etc..

images/23-22.png Foreground Color. This button changes the foreground (text) color of selected text. Used alone or with the background color button it can create text highlighting in almost any color you can imagine. Very useful if you want certain text to stand out from the rest. If you create colors with the Color Chooser dialog, it will remember up to 20 custom colors so you can re-use them again.

images/23-23.png Background Color. This button changes the background color of selected text. Used alone or with the foreground color button it can create text highlighting in almost any color you can imagine. Very useful if you want certain text to stand out from the rest. If you create colors with the Color Chooser dialog, it will remember up to 20 custom colors so you can re-use them again.

images/23-24.png Bold Text Property. This button will turn the bold character style on and off for the selected text.
images/23-25.png Italic Text Property. This button will turn the italic character style on and off for the selected text.
images/23-26.png Underline Text Property. This button will turn on and off the underline character style for the selected text.
images/23-27.png Strikethrough Text Property. This button will turn on and off the strike-through character style for the selected text.

images/23-28.png Toggle h1 Property. This button will turn on and off the HTML "h1", or "Heading 1" property for the selected text. This is often used used to create a hyper-link in HTML pages, which Cherrytree can to from it's nodes. This is still a work in process, but it can be used to create a Table of Contents in a Cherrytree node as well as a HTML document ed from Cherrytree. If you're writing a node that's long and it would be handy to have a table of contents at the top of so people can jump right to a place they're interested in, you could set a "Title" or heading with some initial text for that section in the node and assign it the h1 property by clicking on the button. When assigned, the h1 property will make the text become larger on the page, like a section header. Once you're written all the text for the node, assigning the h1 property where you want or need it, you'd go back to the top of the node page, perhaps putting in a few carriage returns to move the rest of the page down a bit. With the cursor back at the top of the node page, you could got to the menu "Edit > Insert TOC". This would use all the text with the h1 property set as anchors, and create a hyper-link table of contents at the top of the page. Clicking on one of the table selections would jump you to that section.
NOTE: You can now create a table of contents for subnodes or an entire Cherrytree document. See "Table of Contents".

images/23-29.png Toggle h2 Property: This button turns on and off the HTML "h2" or "Heading 2" property for the selected text. See "h1" above for an overview of the purpose for these HTML properties. h2 is used for sub-headings, and when clicked on, the h2 button will enlarge the selected text some, showing that the property is set. h2 is useful to create sub-sections in HTML pages. When you generate a Table of Contents the text assigned the h2 property will become anchored sub-sections under those assigned the h1 property. See the h1 button's NOTE:.

images/23-30.png Toggle h3 Property: This button turns on and off the HTML "h3" or "Heading 3" property for the selected text. See "h1" above for an overview of the purpose for these HTML properties. h3 is used for sub-headings, or sub-sub headings, and when clicked on, the h3 button will enlarge the selected text some, showing that the property is set. h3 is useful to create sub-sub sections in HTML pages. When you generate a Table of Contents the text assigned the h3 property will become anchored sub-sections under those assigned the h2 property. See the h1 button's NOTE:.

images/23-31.pngToggle Small Property: This button turns on and off the HTML "small" text property. Essentially what this does is ensure that any text in an HTML page that has this property remains proportionally smaller than other text on the page, keeping the look consistent regardless of browser settings. Because most browsers have the ability to allow the user to override the web page's default font setting, using this property ensures the text it's assigned to will remain smaller than the other text. Usually used for thing like disclaimers, copyrights and other information or links at the bottom of web pages.

images/23-32.png Toggle Superscript Property: This button turns on and off the superscript text property. Superscript is mainly used for dates (July 4th) and to create symbols (It's 20O outside!), but has other formatting uses.

images/23-33.png Toggle Subscript Property: This button turns on and off the subscript text property. Used with superscript it can create fractions (1/4, 1/2), but is mostly used to create formulas.

images/23-34.png Toggle Monospace Property: This turns on and off the monospace text property. Most modern computer typefaces are "proportional", meaning they adjust the spacing of one letter from another depending on font size and typeface, to give a clean, neat appearance. This requires the software used to present these typefaces to understand the proportioning, which most editors and word-processors do. Many terminal programs do not have built-in understanding, and to properly display text they need a monospaced typeface. Monospace ensures readability by giving each character the same amount of space between it and any adjacent characters. You would use monospace if you plan to your text to a file that will be read by a terminal or other program that doesn't understand or properly display proportional text.


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